Wild Hog Attack! (Video)

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For anyone who thinks wild hogs are not dangerous. Watch this stunning footage.

The beauty of owls

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Owls have always been my favorite bird of prey.

There is something majestic and uniquely beautiful about them and I love their vocalizations that echo through the night.

A barred owl frequently calls out in my neighborhood and has occasionally been spotted atop the telephone pole down on my property.

Last weekend while talking about owls with Jody Blaylock on a group trip to Honobia, Oklahoma, she shared a story of a young great-horned owl that ended up at her feet begging for food.

“The raptor experts who came out to try to catch him said he had obviously been hand-raised, but the good news is he was feeding himself well and eventually came around less and less and the raptor people said there was a good chance he would be able to successfully return to the wild,” she said.

Gotta love this photo and the wild eyes of the awe-inspiring great-horned owl. And in this case a very hungry, demanding one.

Chester Moore, Jr.

baby great horned owl

Young bobcat (video)

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Kingdom Zoo field researcher Todd Jurasek got this clip of a beautiful young bobcat on a trail camera in southern Oklahoma. Sometimes you just have to stop and enjoy a look at God’s Creation.

Chester Moore, Jr.

Jim Fowler on “Moore Outdoors” (Podcast)

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Last Friday I had the most incredible honor of my journalism career.

I interviewed Jim Fowler, co-host of Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom, the groundbreaking program that inspired every other wildlife show since in one way or the other.

Listen to the full show by clicking here.

Jim Fowler and Marlin Perkins in an early edition of Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom.
Jim Fowler and Marlin Perkins in an early edition of Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom.

Chased by “Chupacabra”

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Oct. 18—The dim moonlight illuminated the trees just enough to make out the edge of the forest where it intersected a small field. It was dark but not pitch black and I could just feel that something was going to happen.

I travel this one particular rural road to monitor a local population of what scientists are calling “coy-wolves” a red wolf/coyote hybrid. These which we have captured on game cameras over the years are a spitting image for the red wolves in zoos around the country. I drive this road a lot to howl to locate animals and check for travel corridors coming through the woods.

As I neared an intersection with another road, something jumped out of the ditch and made its way through the tall grass toward the woods.

It was about 20 inches at the shoulder, on four legs, had large coyote-like ears and looked hairless.

Perhaps, I had finally encountered the legendary “chupacabra”.

I have maintained the “chupacabras” seen on many video clips and photos shared on social media are coyotes or foxes with a very bad case of mange.

chupa 2
The mysterious canine enshrouded in the shadows. (Photo by Chester Moore, Jr.)

However, as I pulled over, grabbed my flashlight and ran to the woods edge, my rational explanation wasn’t resonating. I was alone, without a gun, on a dark, country road and looking for a “chupacabra”.

To top things off my flashlight was dying and so was my cell phone.

Sounds like a good start for a horror movie, doesn’t it?

As I pressed toward the woodline, a nasty growl came my direction. Followed by aggressive barks, I could tell there was a canine not happy with my presence. I inched a little closer and could make out a set of blue eyes illuminated by my dim flashlight. A creepy silhouette of a thin animal with tall ears peaking from a behind the tree looking at me, hit my curiosity factor so I moved closer.

At this point, the animal moved and started barking again. Aggressive barks.

It was time for me to go. I may be curious but I am not stupid.

I returned this morning slowly cruising alone the road as a thin layer of mist on the ground began to dissipate.

And about 50 yards from where I left it the night before was the mysterious animal. I quickly shot a few photos with my cell phone as it stood silhouetted in the forest. I could only make out the shape until it moved into an open patch of light.

I could see that it was a dog (mutt) of some sort with short hair that was coming off in large patches. It even had a tiny collar on.

If coyotes and foxes make up the bulk of “chupacabra” sightings, now the domestic dog can join the ranks.

“Chupacabras” are not monsters. They are simply sick animals and in this case I have feeling it was a sick animal dumped off in the woods so the owners would not have to deal with it. Either that or it escaped from somewhere and made a long haul to this stretch of road.

I doubt that though as it hung around the same spot I saw it last night. That’s a sign of an abandoned dog.

I knew what I was looking at was a canine of some sort all along but how many people would be able to tell during a brief sighting under the moonlight?

In this case the “chupacabra” was more like Frankenstein’s monster than some sort of evil being from beyond as some bloggers claim. It’s circumstance was at least partially man-made and it was just doing what it had to do to stay alive.

In this case I was the like the angry mob that drove the monster to the windmill, only with a flashlight instead of a torch. I did however back off and let nature take its course.

After all, Frankenstein’s monster fought back and I had no desire to end up bitten by a chupacabra-one wearing a collar or not.

Chester Moore, Jr.

Bear Creek Feline Center

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Last Monday me and Lisa visited our friends at Bear Creek Feline Center in Panama City, Fl.

Over the years I have been to many animal facilities and always enjoyed it but there is truly something special about this place. Jim Broaddus and his family have a genuine love for the animals and great cougar, Florida panther, Siberian lynx, bobcat, serval and jaguarundi ambassadors.

The work they are doing with jaguarundis is cutting edge and we had the opportunity to see it firsthand. This unique cat may be the least understood in the world and certainly of all cats in the Americas. We’ll have much more on their jaguarundi work here soon.

One of the gorgeous examples of Felis concolor at Bear Creek Feline Center.
One of the gorgeous examples of Felis concolor at Bear Creek Feline Center.

I’m on the road with limited Net time but wanted to give them a shout out and share our enthusiasm for this cool place. You can learn more at http://bearcreekfelinecenter.org/

Chester Moore, Jr.

Chester Moore, Jr.